2004 WEST VIRGINIA LEGISLATIVE ELECTION SURVEYS
West Virginia House of Delegates Candidates
16th Delegate District

Parts of Cabell and Wayne Counties

Click on a candidate's name to see his or her responses:

D -- Susan Hubbard, 6287 Division Road, Huntington, WV 25705

D --  Bobby Nelson, 1490 Bonnie Blvd., Huntington, WV 25705
NO SURVEY AVAILABLE

D -- Dale Stephens, P.O. Box 9006, Huntington, WV 25704-0006
NO SURVEY AVAILABLE

R -- Greg Howard, 40 Lost Valley Drive, Huntington, WV 25705
NO SURVEY AVAILABLE

R -- Matt Sabin, 1707 Crestmont Drive, Huntington, WV 25701
NO SURVEY AVAILABLE

R -- Kelli Sobonya, PO Box 367, Barboursville, WV 25504

NO SURVEY AVAILABLE

Susan Hubbard (D)

Delegate District 16

6287 Division Road

Huntington, WV  25705

  

1. Some say that a growing economy will lift all boats, but, despite some recent encouraging economic news, the evidence is that many hard-working families are falling further behind. What specific legislative plans do you have to help grow businesses in West Virginia that provide jobs with wages and benefits sufficient to support a family?

 

To help businesses to grow in West Virginia that provide jobs with wages and benefits to support a family, the Legislature needs to offer tax incentives for small businesses to cover health care benefits or combine health care benefits for several businesses as a pool for lower affordable care.

 

2. More mothers have entered the workforce in recent years, partly out of economic necessity. While some parents are satisfied with their arrangements, many have concerns about finding good, flexible childcare programs and paying for them once they do. As a legislator, what will you do to promote affordable, high quality childcare in West Virginia?

 

To promote affordable, high quality childcare for working mothers, the state needs to fund additional pre-school/nursery programs in conjunction with federally funded pre-school programs for maximum high quality childcare with professional learning centers to advance child learning at an early age.

 

3. Federal and state welfare reform laws passed in the mid-1990s include requirements that pose problems for parents pursuing education and job training that gives them skills and employment opportunities. Many of these families have reached, or are about to reach, their lifetime federal welfare benefits and are still unemployed. As a legislator, what policies would you propose to better support families who face these challenges and to help raise them out of poverty?

 

To better support families who face challenges and need help out of poverty, the Legislature needs programs that offer childcare and transportation to education and training opportunities especially in rural areas where employment is almost non-existent.

 

4. In 2004, the West Virginia Legislature passed a resolution calling for a study by the Children's Health Insurance Program Board to examine a potential expansion to children at 250 and 300% of the Federal Poverty Level. But many of their parents, typically lower-wage workers without benefits, remain uninsured. As a legislator, what will you do to ensure the continuation and expansion of children's health insurance, as well as coverage for parents and other working-age adults?

 

To ensure the continuation and expansion of children's health insurance and coverage for parents and other working-age adults, the state could offer incentives to local businesses or low cost insurance based on poverty level and low wage earning base.

 

5. A recent federal review found that West Virginia's child protective services system is not doing enough to assure the safety and well-being of children. As a legislator, what policies and programs will you promote to improve the well-being of children who have been abused or neglected? What actions will you support to prevent child abuse from happening in the first place?

 

To improve the well-being of children who have been abused or neglected, child protective services system needs to be correlated with all child related services and the legal court systems so that each child has related protection and immediate caseworker with reduced caseloads.  More adult parent training classes need to be available to assist in preventing possible abuse.

 

6. Studies show that many children who witness domestic violence suffer a great deal of pain and trauma, even if they are not directly abused themselves. As a legislator, what policies and programs will you promote to help reduce the incidence of domestic violence and to aid domestic violence survivors and their children?

 

To reduce the incidence of domestic violence and to aid violence survivors and their children, a total community awareness program of reporting and reacting to protect victims that involves law enforcement agencies is necessary.  Both public schools and communities need to aid victims in having a safe protective place to go.

 

7. In 2004 the Legislature revised the 1990 legislation that created the Governor's Cabinet on Children and Families to better coordinate policies and programs at the state level and to support Family Resource Networks, Starting Point Centers, and other programs at the community level. As a legislator, would you support the continuation of these activities and, if so, what policy outcomes would you like to pursue through the Governor's Cabinet on Children and Families?

 

I would support the continuation of these activities, but see that the Governor's Cabinet on Children and Families needs oversight and review to insure community level programs are meeting the needs as proposed.  The Family Resource Networks and other programs are greatly needed.

 

8. West Virginia's Promise Scholarship and needs-based grant program aim to increase in-state college attendance rates among our state's young people, thereby expanding their opportunities in work and in life. In June's special session of the Legislature, eligibility standards for the Promise scholarships were raised in anticipation of the $10 million yearly increase in the program's cost by the 2005-06 school year. As a legislator in these tight budget times, if the state cannot fund all eligible applicants, how would you establish priorities for these programs?

 

If the state cannot fund all eligible applicants for Promise Scholarships, the Legislature needs to address not only grades and ACT scores, but the ability to pay tuition and room and board based on family's ability to pay relative to family size and job security.

 

9. Currently 60% of West Virginia children between 6 and 17 live in households with working parents. Although the hours after school are peak hours for juvenile crime, high quality and affordable after school programs are not available to all West Virginia school children, especially for children over 12. As a legislator, how great a priority would you place on successful after school programs that provide learning activities and connect children with caring adults, and what policies would you support related to such programs?

 

I place a high priority on after school programs that provide learning activities for all age children.  Such programs can offered after school with tuition based on ability to pay and seeking of grant money from both state and federal incentives.  Providing training and involvement of parents in programs would add community support.

 

10. As a legislative candidate, are there any children and family policy issues that you would like to address that have not been covered in the above questions?

 

The state funding of foster care concerns me.  The per child reimbursement needs raised to allow quality homes and proper medical and everyday care for foster children.

 

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